green-derryck

Derryck Green

Project 21, National Center for Public Policy Research

Derryck Green is member of Project 21 – a Leadership Network of Black Conservatives- and a contributor to the National Center for Public Policy Research where he provides analysis on economic policy, the intersection between culture and race; pro-life issues including abortion and capital punishment; religion, immigration policy, and politics in general.

As a political commentator and writer, his work has been featured and citied in a number of media outlets, including Townhall.com, Spectator.org, MereOrthodxy.com, TheAmericanConservative.com, American Urban Radio Networks and several other media outlets across the country.  Recently, Derryck was featured in CQ Researcher for an in-depth report concerning the rise in racial conflict affecting the country, which led to an invitation to share his thoughts with CQ Researcher in a thought piece concerning black identity politics and Black Lives Matter as he argued against the validity, credibility, and agenda of the black activist organization. Derryck is currently a contributor to the Institute on Religion and Democracy’s blog, Juicy Ecumenism, where he focuses on the intersection of race, religion, and the heresy within progressive Christianity.

As faculty at Prager University, he wrote and appeared in a video entitled, “Who Are The Racists: Conservatives or Liberals?” where he debunked the myth of conservative racism. The video has been seen over two million times across various social media outlets.

As a public speaker, Derryck regularly appears as a presenter for the Young America’s Foundation and the Young Americans for Freedom. He also speaks at churches and other civic organizations on the social, economic, and religious importance of racial healing, conservatism, and reconciliation.

Derryck received his M.A. in Theological Studies with a concentration in Comparative Theology from Fuller Theological Seminary. He received his doctorate in theology and ministry, specializing in religious and racial identity formation, from Azusa Pacific University. His dissertation- Transcending Blackness: From Racial Identity Crisis to Christian Identity Formation, culturally and theologically analyzes the post-civil rights rise, and crisis, of black identity, which has compromised Christian spiritual formation, and postponed the race-neutral ambition of the civil rights movement- full integration by blacks into American society.